Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Let's Vote!

OK, the Americans should be rested up from the election. It's been 3 weeks. Now we all can turn our attention to important things -- like what to call the phrase in the book which is the source of the title. Finding this during my reading produces such a frisson of pleasure that if there is no name for it, I must name it something. So let's vote. Here are the possibilities that have been generated so far:

Namesake
Titular phrase
Eponymous phrase
Title drop
_____________ (write-in choice)

Leave your choice in the comment section. The votes will be counted and announced on Sunday, November 30.

18 comments:

raidergirl3 said...

Wee, what fun!

Although eponymous is one of my favorite words, I prefer "title drop" for this particular phrase.

Sandra said...

Yes, title drop sounds pithy.

("Titular phrase" is what teenage boys whisper in a girl's ear to distract from their fumbling as they're unhooking a bra)

Chain Reader said...

I like "eponymous phrase."

M said...

I like "title drop". "Eponymous" to me doesn't fit since that usually refers to the name of a character...I think it could get confusing if we used that term. :)

literatehousewife said...

When you first posted about this, I tried looking up self-referencing sentence. I found nothing. Still, I'll write that one in.

bkclubcare said...

Title drop gets my vote, but I would love to see a new original unique word...

Tidropsy? Pordeltit? (emphasis on 2nd syllable, of course)

or use the German: Titeltropfen,
I like the Dutch translation: titel daling.

"In the last book I read, the pordeltit was found on the very first page."

Amy(The Sleepy Reader) said...

I was torn between eponymous phrase and title drop but I'll go with the majority on this one and choose "Title Drop"

Jeane said...

I like the way "eponymous phrase" sounds, but I have a hunch here that "title drop" is going to win.

jessi said...

TITLE DROP! :)

Bookfool said...

Title drop works best for me, but I sound like a ditto.

The word verification is flamate. There's got to be a really interesting fake definition for that one.

Bybee said...

I'm not voting yet, but have to admit to a sneaking fondness for Tidropsy!

Bybee said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
John Mutford said...

Title Drop for me please!

(and if you're still in a voting mood, there's a Great Wednesday Compare just waiting...)

Isabella said...

Title drop.

Really interesting question, Bybee. I'm surprised there's not already a name for it. Can't think of anything to rival your suggestions, but I'm going to keep thinking about it for days.

Sam Houston said...

I do like the sound of "title drop."

I've gotten into the habit of looking for the "title drop" in just about every book I read - for some reason, it feels like a real accomplishment when I find one. Now I wish I had kept a list all these years. :-)

Susan said...

I know about the frisson of pleasure, I get it too! But even though I did my degree in English literature, I don't think this was ever covered! Tidropsy gets my vote, but I can see everyone rolling their eyes at my pretentiousness the next time I use it, so I think Title Drop won't scare anyone! I like eponymous also, but I think it would get confused with the actual personal name it is used with (mostly on music albums it seems!).

Carrie K said...

Why has this never occurred to me? A whole new vista has been opened up.

Okay, I'm not super crazy about "title drop" but I can't think of anything better and it does fit the definition well.

Jessica said...

I'm leaning toward titular reference.